mpa

MPA Summer Leadership Retreat 2016

Wednesday, June 22 – Friday, June 24
Point Lookout | Northport, ME

 

MPA Leadership Retreat Overview

TREE-NUT/PEANUT FREE ZONE
The MPA Leadership Retreat is a tree-nut and peanut free conference. For safety and health reasons, please refrain from bringing anything containing tree-nuts or peanuts to the conference or on-site at Point Lookout.

The 2016 MPA Summer Leadership Retreat, sponsored by the Maine Principals’ Association, in collaboration with Great Schools Partnership, is an annual three-day retreat for leadership teams to:

  • Build internal leadership capacity
  • Learn about and develop specific strategies to effectively implement proficiency-based learning with emphasis on policy, practice and community engagement;
  • Utilize a school improvement coach to support the completion of data analysis, receive feedback on your work, and suggest best practices and promising approaches based on the unique context of your school or district; and,
  • Leave with a completed comprehensive school improvement plan for the coming year that is informed by the cycle of action and specific feedback from colleagues from other schools.

Schools are responsible for implementing the important changes taking place at the state level including proficiency-based graduation, Common Core, educator effectiveness, and other important local priorities.

This retreat will allow leadership teams to connect and spend time focusing on the development of an actionable plan for the upcoming school year. Team members will participate in workshops, informational sessions, and engage in dedicated team planning time with coaches who are available to facilitate and support a successful experience.

Workshop Sessions

The Great Schools Partnership is committed to tailoring the breakout sessions to meet the needs of participating teams. Once a team registers, a GSP Senior Associate will schedule a brief phone conversation to better understand the hopes and intentions for the three-day retreat, where the school/district is in terms of its improvement efforts, and any specific needs or requests that will ensure the experience is meaningful and productive.

Based on discussions we have conducted so far with registered teams, we are organizing the breakout sessions into the following three broad areas:

1. Leadership  
Workshops in this strand will focus on the successful elements and practices of high-functioning teams, school and district planning, and professional learning groups.

2. Proficiency-Based Learning
Workshops in this strand will address grading and reporting, habits of work, instructional planning, assessment, and Guiding Principles.

3. Engagement
Workshops in this strand will focus on the ways to cultivate student voice and choice, authentic community engagement, and communicating school improvement efforts.

Opening Session: Wednesday, June 22, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Action Planning Information

Session A: Wednesday, June 22, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

In this workshop, participants will learn about the fundamental components of an effective proficiency-based teaching and learning system, learn about an array of resources that can support their work, and identify entry points for transitioning to proficiency-based learning.

Materials

Presentation Slides

Monitoring and reporting academic achievement separately from work habits, character traits, and behaviors such as attendance, class participation, and turning work in on time can yield a more accurate report card and can increase student motivation.

In this session, participants will learn about habits-of-work reporting and how the practice can help teachers more accurately diagnose learning needs and improve academic interventions and support. Participants will also learn how to communicate the rationale for separating work habits from content knowledge and skills in grading, and how to engage students, faculty, families, and community members in the process. The presentation will include examples of report cards and transcripts from schools that separate the reporting of academic achievement and work habits

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

As schools embark on ambitious improvement, the ways in which all of the leaders approach this work can significantly impact the outcomes. Through an examination of key research findings in neuroscience and mindfulness, participants will look at their own leadership strengths and challenges to find ways to improve their work as leaders.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

Shared leadership, distributed leadership, transformative leadership- what are these and how do we get our schools there?  In this session, participants will consider aspects of a system of communication, transparency, and accountability that ensures fidelity to the school’s vision, mission, and action plan while honoring and valuing all stakeholder voices.  Emphasis will be placed on structures and processes that can help to develop a collaborative, respectful school culture where faculty is involved in critical instructional decisions and the design of professional development that foster a common vision and shared responsibility.

Materials

Presentation Slides

The transition to proficiency-based learning is one of the most important educational strategies being pursued by numerous schools across New England and the country. Yet while nearly everyone agrees that higher academic achievement and stronger student preparation are absolutely essential in today’s world, explaining the rationale behind learning standards and proficiency-based diplomas, or describing new approaches to instruction, assessment, grading, and reporting, can quickly pose a tricky communications dilemma for educators.

In this session, the presenters will discuss a variety of research-based strategies that will help school leaders and educators increase understanding of proficiency-based learning in their communities, including the construction of a compelling narrative, the power of metaphors and specific examples, and the use of language that speaks to the values of parents, families, and community members. Participants will leave with a stronger understanding of how to talk about proficiency-based learning in ways that are comprehensible and compelling to a wide variety of audiences.

Materials

Presentation Slides

Session B: Wednesday, June 22, 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

How can proficiency-based learning serve students with disabilities? When successfully designed and executed, a proficiency-based system can improve and accelerate learning for all students, clarify academic expectations, enable differentiated instruction, refocus teachers on the assessment of learning rather than compliance, and–above all–ensure equitable access to the curriculum and multiple opportunities for success. In a proficiency-based system, Individual Education Plans (IEPs) can not only address unique learning needs, but they can also scaffold the learning process and move students toward college readiness and postsecondary success.

In this session, the presenters will address the role of Individual Educations Plans in a proficiency-based system, including the development of appropriate accommodations to ensure that students with disabilities achieve proficiency.

Materials

Presentation Slides

Participants will leave with a stronger understanding of the components of district-wide and school-wide implementation of proficiency-based learning and a set of resources, such as a district self-assessment and planning tool and action planning template. The resources are designed to guide a leadership team through a thoughtful process that will result in a concrete plan of action, building upon the district’s and/or school’s existing assets in the areas of policy, practice, and community engagement. This session will also focus on the particular role leaders and the leadership team must play, both at the district and school level.

Materials

Presentation Slides

The transition to proficiency-based learning is one of the most important educational strategies being pursued by numerous schools across New England and the country. Yet while nearly everyone agrees that higher academic achievement and stronger student preparation are absolutely essential in today’s world, explaining the rationale behind learning standards and proficiency-based diplomas, or describing new approaches to instruction, assessment, grading, and reporting, can quickly pose a tricky communications dilemma for educators.

In this session, the presenters will discuss a variety of research-based strategies that will help school leaders and educators increase understanding of proficiency-based learning in their communities, including the construction of a compelling narrative, the power of metaphors and specific examples, and the use of language that speaks to the values of parents, families, and community members. Participants will leave with a stronger understanding of how to talk about proficiency-based learning in ways that are comprehensible and compelling to a wide variety of audiences.

Materials

Presentation Slides

In many schools, the primary vehicle for student voice in school-wide matters is through an elected student council.  Although valuable, often significant members of the student body do not have a real voice. With help from students from Yarmouth High School, this session will examine ways to increase student voice in the school through reimagined student government, advisor programs, school board representation, and other activities and programs designed in facilitate student voice.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

Session C: Thursday, June 24, 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM

The transition to a proficiency-based system of teaching and learning can bring changes in the scoring criteria or rubrics that are used to grade student work, the gradebooks that are used to record student progress, and the transcripts that are used to communicate student achievement. This presentation will explore how these changes in grading and reporting can change how teachers approach instruction and assessment. The presenters will share examples from various middle and high school classrooms, and will discuss how different approaches to designing graduation standards, performance indicators, and reporting systems can yield different changes in instruction

Materials 
Presentation Slides
Agenda
Video of Session

As schools transition to proficiency-based diplomas, it is important to be fully prepared with the reporting of student progress through an clear transcript and informative school profile.  In addition, a close examination of current practices for student recognition is a critical step in ensuring alignment with the school’s goals.  In this session, we will look at transcripts, profiles, and recognition protocols that align with proficiency-based learning.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

Participants will leave with a stronger understanding of the components of district-wide and school-wide implementation of proficiency-based learning and a set of resources, such as a district self-assessment and planning tool and action planning template. The resources are designed to guide a leadership team through a thoughtful process that will result in a concrete plan of action, building upon the district’s and/or school’s existing assets in the areas of policy, practice, and community engagement. This session will also focus on the particular role leaders and the leadership team must play, both at the district and school level.

Materials

Presentation Slides

As schools embark on ambitious improvement, the ways in which all of the leaders approach this work can significantly impact the outcomes.  Through an examination of key research findings in neuroscience and mindfulness, participants will look at their own leadership strengths and challenges to find ways to improve their work as leaders.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

Session D: Thursday, June 24, 10:15 AM – 11:45 AM

Monitoring and reporting academic achievement separately from work habits, character traits, and behaviors such as attendance, class participation, and turning work in on time can yield a more accurate report card and can increase student motivation.

In this session, participants will learn about habits-of-work reporting and how the practice can help teachers more accurately diagnose learning needs and improve academic interventions and support. Participants will also learn how to communicate the rationale for separating work habits from content knowledge and skills in grading, and how to engage students, faculty, families, and community members in the process. The presentation will include examples of report cards and transcripts from schools that separate the reporting of academic achievement and work habits.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

An extensive and growing body of research has shown that professional learning groups provide highly effective professional development for educators—when they are well designed, well facilitated, and supported by their schools. In this session, presenters and participants will explore the most effective ways to focus PLGs on building capacity in teachers as they implement personalized, proficiency-based teaching and learning in schools/districts.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

As schools continue to bring about improved practices for student learning, it is very important that all stakeholders in the community are not just informed, but engaged in the changes.  In this session, participants will, through a variety of examples, better understand authentic school-community engagement.  Using a planning tool, participants will learn about the concept of “planning for the plan” by considering effective entry points for school and community engagement.

Materials

Presentation Slides
Agenda

Other Information

Registration:

  • $2000 per four-person team ($375 per additional member)
  • Cost includes plan development, Great Schools Partnership coaching support, workshops, and meals and refreshments
  • Please mail and make checks payable to Great Schools Partnership

Cancellation Policy:

  • Attendee names may be changed/substituted at no charge. Please send name changes to dhart@greatschoolspartnership.org. There will be NO refunds for individuals or teams after Monday, June 6, 2016.

Who should attend?:

  • Principals
  • Teacher leaders
  • Superintendents, curriculum leaders
  • School board members
  • Any school or district member integral to annual action planning focused on the implementation of proficiency-based education and other important school improvement initiatives

Lodging:

Point Lookout has set aside a limited number of one, two, and three-bedroom cabins with rates beginning at $124 per night (Call directly for group rates: 800-515-3611)

Additional lodging locations include:

Accolades from Last Year’s Participants

“Really gave me perspective on how to plan.”

“Gave me ideas on how to incorporate more than just administrators in leadership positions”

“[This workshop was] hugely important in shaping my thinking  on the direction we need to go in reporting students achievement.”

“We got so much good stuff done!”

“The presentation and tuning with another district was so valuable, and a great way to end the workshop. It set up our planning for 2014-2015, and has again for 2015-2016.”